Clinical Research

Clinical trials are used to determine whether new biomedical or behavior interventions involving medications, devices, diagnostic products and treatment regimes are safe and effective in humans.

Clinical research studies are important because they have the potential to improve function, prognosis or quality of life for children living with cardiomyopathy. Families can ask their pediatric cardiologist or geneticist to recommend appropriate studies.

The site, ClinicalTrials.gov, provides information on publicly and privately funded studies being conducted worldwide. Maintained by the National Library of Medicine, this public resource enables the public to search for past and current clinical trials on cardiomyopathy.

Studies Actively Recruiting

The Foundation works with many researchers to assist with patient recruitment for national studies focused on cardiomyopathy. Below are studies actively recruiting patients.

  • Lifestyle and Exercise in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
    Rachel Lampert, M.D.
    Yale University Medical Center
  • The LIVE-HCM study is a National Institutes of Health-funded study that will determine how lifestyle and exercise impact the well-being of individuals 8-60 years old with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recruitment is over half way completed, with still room to enroll. ! Study site

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has an informative website, Children and Clinical Studies, that explains what participating in a clinical research study entails.

Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry

 

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